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Software, Windows
Fakin' The Funk? 3.0.0.139 Multilingual Portable screenshot
P2P|16.06.2020| 29 MB
Fakin 'Funk is a small application with a narrow specialization: to determine the true quality of audio tracks. Not being a critical software for a wide range of consumers, the program will be useful for real audiophiles and people who like to share their files with other users. Today, far from all the resources that allow you to download music from their website (even for money), conscientiously relate to the issue of maintaining the original quality of the tracks. For example, tracks with 320 kilobits per second accepted as the classic standard often turn out to be a product of such a phenomenon as upscaling. Simply put, owners of a portal with a music database take files with a bit rate of 128 kbit / s as a basis, and then programmatically “pull” them up to 320 kbit / s, although this does not affect the real sound quality (the same is true for peak frequencies). If earlier, in the era of small and expensive memory cards for smartphones, this could make sense - tracks of poor quality weigh less - then today this phenomenon can be considered a direct deception of the consumer. The Fakin 'Funk program is designed to fight this problem: uploading your own audio files to it, you can get accurate technical data and compare their compliance with the stated numbers.

Among the key features of the utility that distinguish it from less attractive analogues are:

- intuitive interface;
- protection against bit rate optimizers;
- identification of damaged or broken files;
- support for all relevant audio formats (mp3, mp4, ogg, flac, wma, aac, wav and others);
- multithreaded analysis architecture to speed up the process;
- spectral analysis.

An important advantage of Fakin 'Funk is the ability to batch process data - there is no need to manually check each track individually. It is also convenient that downloaded audio files can be listened directly to the program using the built-in player. Finally, many users will be pleased with the ability to edit tags embedded in files, as well as search for new tracks in such popular databases as Amazon, iTunes and others. Download Fakin 'Funk free program for analyzing the quality of audio files, their bit rate and more.




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comments

  Resident 5.12.2012 758 16460
+9593
Uploaded | Rapidgator | Nitroflare | Rockfile | Clicknupload
  Member 22.12.2018 300
+125
With this software you can pick the best encoded file among dozens (of the same track) nominally bearing the same bit-rate, downloaded from somewhere...
According to my experience, at least 40% of files on the internet are re-encoded from lower bit-rate files (fake bit-rate), and among the rest ~60% there are significant differences in encoding quality.
You should chose 'Aggressive analysis mode' in Settings in order to detect more fake files.
The software also does identification of damaged, shortened or broken files.
  Member 23.06.2019 3 35
+13
soulseek users are gonna be stoked on this one
  Member 12.04.2013 1 158
+28
I'm not sure about the Aggressive analysis mode (see also my other reply). It detects definitely tracks that aren't re-encoded. Older tracks that aren't that loud mastered for example or tracks that don't have the same clarity compared to nowadays standards. I truly think that if tracks pass the regular check (so without aggressive) they're good to go. My ears are also good enough trained in 2 decades to hear the difference. Maybe not so much compared to 256 (which is also sold by some download portals) but 192 or lower absolutely.
I'm an orange critter from Arcade with a large nose (but I don't lie!).
  Member 10.08.2017 3
0
i use spek :/

its useful this soft?
  Member 12.04.2013 1 158
+28
Very helpful app indeed!
Not only Soulseek users, it even found 'bad' files sold by Beatport. I contacted them about this and received the following message:

Thanks for reaching out about the files you ran through a spectrum analyzer.
We do recognize that the waveform image for some files may not be at the level they would normally be at for a high quality MP3, however, this is typical for a production that was not mastered well. It does not necessarily mean that the file is not a true MP3.

Most spectrum analysis bitrate discrepancies are based on the waveform's comparison to the embedded bitrate, and doesn't always factor in quality. As the standards of quality differ for all labels and artists, so will the music they produce. Releases available from prominent artists and labels are generally mastered well, as they are more likely to have the resources to do so. A production from someone's laptop in their bedroom will usually differ from one with paid studio time and quality production tools.

I can confirm both tracks have been encoded from a real master WAV file.


So I said that the tracks were from a professional dj/producer, even contacted him myself to figure it out. But haven't heard anything about it since.

I know this is the Windows section. However, I'm using this app on Mac Mojave, it's not that stable (due to Wine) but it does the job. Unfortunately, it's not working on Catalina so I didn't update yet (also due to other reasons) so I see a lot of angry feedback from people that paid for it (I did too) but now left in the dark because the developer can't/won't fix it.
I'm an orange critter from Arcade with a large nose (but I don't lie!).
  Resident 26.02.2013 30 1273
+2005
@ very interesting D-Music
quote by D-Music
I can confirm both tracks have been encoded from a real master WAV file.


So I said that the tracks were from a professional dj/producer, even contacted him myself to figure it out. But haven't heard anything about it since.

I'll link you to this presentation by Bob LUDWIG, in 2009 :

SXSW: Metallica and the Loudness Wars

Metallica’s fans launching a petition for a remix-remaster :

Re-Mix or Remaster Death Magnetic!

Later on, B.L. also showed to some of us ( I was visiting a good French friend who moved to Austin at this very moment ) what he got to work on : he zoomed in parts of some original master stereo mixes, with sections of 1/5 of a second length or more (!) looking like - and sounding as - pieces of squashed, crinkled papers thrown in the trashbin, zig-zagging on the full dynamic scale of the tracks : hideous mix printings errors :-( .

Terrible ! Not the only specimens, but " enlightening " ones, IMHO.
' It's because the speed of light is greater than that of sound that so many people appear brilliant until they open their mouth ... '
  Member 12.04.2013 1 158
+28
Also interesting! Luckily the loudness/RMS war isn't that important anymore now streaming services like Spotify use a much lower LUFS.
I'm an orange critter from Arcade with a large nose (but I don't lie!).
  Resident 26.02.2013 30 1273
+2005
=>

27 March 2020

Eelco Grimm, Bob Katz and Bob Ludwig :

Dynamic Range Day Webcast

The AES recommendations shown by Bob KATZ is : here to read ( at 1:02:24 )
' It's because the speed of light is greater than that of sound that so many people appear brilliant until they open their mouth ... '
  Resident 25.12.2017 2 1171
+310
I was *just looking for something like this online about a week ago, and then *BAM!!* here it is!! Much appreciated, *i'm not spamming AudioZ*.
"Rap is a gimmick, but I'm for the Hip Hop, The Culture." - Method Man -
  Member 2.11.2018 170
+24
I click on the exe file but nothing happens. The folder contains registry files as it had been manually extracted from a user computer and then reassembled. Anyone could make it work?
  Resident 10.08.2010 1 360
+55
it works on my system running W7 but not on the one I have with W10 for some reason, even when using the compatibility mode....I reckon that's the issue you have too.
Madness takes its toll. Please have exact change.
  Member 22.12.2018 300
+125
We do recognize that the waveform image for some files may not be at the level they would normally be at for a high quality MP3, however, this is typical for a production that was not mastered well. It does not necessarily mean that the file is not a true MP3.
- 1. It isn't about mastering, but about the spectral content.
- 2. And it is about - if it is sharply cut off @15, 16kHz, 18 kHz, etc., and/or contains spectral holes. About the lack of information present in normal WAV files, or in files really encoded at declared bitrate.

Most spectrum analysis bitrate discrepancies are based on the waveform's comparison to the embedded bitrate, and doesn't always factor in quality.
- Yes, based on the fact that the waveform is crippled. And it always means that quality too is crippled.

As the standards of quality differ for all labels and artists, so will the music they produce. Releases available from prominent artists and labels are generally mastered well, as they are more likely to have the resources to do so. A production from someone's laptop in their bedroom will usually differ from one with paid studio time and quality production tools.
- that is not a matter of 'standards of quality' but of physical parameters of the file. Fake files are encoded through psychoacoustic filters and compressed[i] more than once if the actual bitrate does not match the nominal. Period.

I can confirm both tracks have been encoded from a real master WAV file.
- I can confirm that no one can beat spectrum analyser by his verbal 'confirmations'.
- And the guy did not say the crucial word: "directly".
  Member 22.12.2018 300
+125
Also 'Aggressive analysis mode' does not show false positives, it reveals the double cheat.
In order to swindle their customers and bewilder spectral analysers, during re-encoding to 'higher' bit-rates the sellers saturate the spectral gap of lower bitrate 'original' mp3 files with pink noise.
No provider has access to hundreds of thousands of original WAVs to encode [even not to 10% of that number], so they mostly resell files they downloaded from all kinds of sources, including PnP networks and even YouTube.
  Member 12.04.2013 1 158
+28
You seem to know a lot of this subject so I appreciate the feedback. However, if it isn't audible, should I (or we) really go that deep? I mean, some tracks will never pass the check, even with WAV or FLAC releases. Asking the producer directly (there's the word!) for a version would be a solution but unfortunately, that doesn't work most of the time. That said, if I was a pro with releases on legit download portals and someone said to me "they're not passing the analyser test" I would definitely want to know more about it.

Another example, I found a track that is sold as a mono file while the label had the same track published on YouTube in stereo (but in a lower quality obviously). No fix by BP - even though they admitted it - and also no response from the original artist. So they don't care what version the customers get?! Strange.

There was a time when WEB releases were reliable but even that isn't the case anymore.
I'm an orange critter from Arcade with a large nose (but I don't lie!).
  Member 22.12.2018 300
+125
Any lowering of the original bitrate is audible because it strips off some amount of information from the original audio file. And each lossy re-encoding means re-filtering of already [first time] filtered material.
WAV or FLAC, if genuine, have the maximum of information those formats can bear.
If you encode WAV or FLAC to mp3 @320 kbps you must lose some information, but @160 kbps you keep only a half of that. If someone re-encodes 160 to 320 you do not get any new information, but lose some, because of re-compression and re-filtering, so it's a technical cheat, but also audible [depending on number of re-encodings and difference in bit-rates].

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